How does testicular cancer affect the body?

Pain, discomfort, or numbness in a testicle or the scrotum, with or without swelling. Change in the way a testicle feels or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum. For example, 1 testicle may become firmer than the other testicle. Or testicular cancer may cause the testicle to grow bigger or to become smaller.

What problems can testicular cancer cause?

Testicular cancer can also cause other symptoms, including: an increase in the firmness of a testicle. a difference in apperance between 1 testicle and the other. a dull ache or sharp pain in your testicles or scrotum, which may come and go.

Who does testicular cancer affect?

About half of testicular cancers occur in men between the ages of 20 and 34. But this cancer can affect males of any age, including infants and elderly men.

Does testicular cancer make you tired?

A painless lump, swelling or enlargement of one or both testes. Pain or heaviness in the scrotum. A dull ache or pressure in the groin, abdomen or low back. A general feeling of malaise, including unexplained fatigue, fever, sweating, coughing, shortness of breath or mild chest pains.

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What are the long term effects of testicular cancer?

This powerful combination routinely produces all the harsh side effects associated with chemotherapy, but it can also lead to a litany of long-term side effects: infertility, low testosterone, lung scarring, hypertension, coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and secondary cancers.

Does testicular cancer affect sperm?

Testicular cancer or its treatment can make you infertile (unable to father a child). Before treatment starts, men who might want to father children may consider storing sperm in a sperm bank for later use. But testicular cancer also can cause low sperm counts, which could make it hard to get a good sample.

Is testicular cancer fatal?

Testicular cancer is a potentially deadly disease. Although it accounts for only 1.2% of all cancers in males, cancer of the testis accounts for about 11%-13% of all cancer deaths of men between the ages of 15-35.

Can testicular cancer be cured?

If the cancer returns following treatment for stage 1 testicular cancer and it’s diagnosed at an early stage, it’s usually possible to cure it using chemotherapy and possibly also radiotherapy. Some types of recurring testicular cancer have a cure rate of over 95%.

Can testicular cancer go away by itself?

Testicular cancer is very curable. While a cancer diagnosis is always serious, the good news about testicular cancer is that it is treated successfully in 95% of cases. If treated early, the cure rate rises to 98%.

Can one testicle twist?

In most males, a testicle can’t twist because the tissue around it is well attached. Some males are born with no tissue holding the testes to the scrotum. This lets the testes “swing” inside the scrotum (often called a “bell clapper” deformity). Torsion can happen on either side, but rarely on both sides.

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How long can you live with untreated testicular cancer?

The general 5-year survival rate for men with testicular cancer is 95%. This means that 95 men out of every 100 men diagnosed with testicular cancer will live at least 5 years after diagnosis. The survival rate is higher for people diagnosed with early-stage cancer and lower for those with later-stage cancer.

What does a testicular cancer feel like?

A painless lump or swelling on either testicle. If found early, a testicular tumor may be about the size of a pea or a marble, but it can grow much larger. Pain, discomfort, or numbness in a testicle or the scrotum, with or without swelling. Change in the way a testicle feels or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum.

What are the 5 warning signs of prostate cancer?

What are 5 Common Warning Signs of Prostate Cancer?

  • Pain and/or a “burning sensation” when urinating or ejaculating.
  • Frequent urination, especially during the nighttime.
  • Trouble starting urination, or stopping urination once in progress.
  • Sudden erectile dysfunction.
  • Blood in either urine or semen.