Question: What symptoms distinguish malignant melanoma from basal cell or squamous cell carcinomas?

Melanoma typically begins as a mole and can occur anywhere on the body. Squamous cell carcinoma may appear as a firm red bump, a scaly patch, or open sore, or a wart that may crust or bleed easily. Basal cell carcinoma may appear as a small white or flesh-colored bump that grows slowly and may bleed.

How can you tell the difference between squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma?

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Though this form of skin cancer is not usually life-threatening, one major difference between basal cell and squamous cell cancers is that squamous cell cancer are more likely to grow deeper into the layers of your skin and spread to other parts of the body.

How does basal cell carcinoma compare with malignant melanoma which is more serious?

While it is less common than basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), melanoma is more dangerous because of its ability to spread to other organs more rapidly if it is not treated at an early stage. Learn more about melanoma types, risk factors, causes, warning signs and treatment.

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What are the 5 warning signs of malignant melanoma?

The “ABCDE” rule is helpful in remembering the warning signs of melanoma:

  • Asymmetry. The shape of one-half of the mole does not match the other.
  • Border. The edges are ragged, notched, uneven, or blurred.
  • Color. Shades of black, brown, and tan may be present. …
  • Diameter. …
  • Evolving.

What are the distinguishing characteristics of basal cell carcinoma?

Basal cell carcinoma appears as a change in the skin, such as a growth or a sore that won’t heal. These changes in the skin (lesions) usually have one of the following characteristics: A shiny, skin-colored bump that’s translucent, meaning you can see a bit through the surface.

Can melanoma be mistaken for BCC?

Amelanotic melanomas can resemble other skin cancers like basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma, or worse, may be mistaken for benign moles, scars or cysts.

What is melanoma What is the Abcde rule for recognizing melanoma?

One easy way to remember common characteristics of melanoma is to think alphabetically – the ABCDEs of melanoma. ABCDE stands for asymmetry, border, color, diameter and evolving. These are the characteristics of skin damage that doctors look for when diagnosing and classifying melanomas.

Which is worse squamous cell or melanoma?

It’s three times as common as melanoma (some 200,000 new cases each year versus 62,000). Though not as common as basal cell (about one million new cases a year), squamous cell is more serious because it is likely to spread (metastasize).

What is the difference between melanoma and malignant melanoma?

Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the melanocytes. Other names for this cancer include malignant melanoma and cutaneous melanoma. Most melanoma cells still make melanin, so melanoma tumors are usually brown or black.

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What are symptoms of melanoma Besides moles?

Other melanoma warning signs may include:

  • Sores that don’t heal.
  • Pigment, redness or swelling that spreads outside the border of a spot to the surrounding skin.
  • Itchiness, tenderness or pain.
  • Changes in texture, or scales, oozing or bleeding from an existing mole.

Does melanoma show up in blood work?

Blood tests. Blood tests aren’t used to diagnose melanoma, but some tests may be done before or during treatment, especially for more advanced melanomas. Doctors often test blood for levels of a substance called lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) before treatment.

Does melanoma always itch?

Some melanomas itch. The “E” in the ABCDE rule of melanoma is for “Evolving,” which means that something about the mole changes. New itching or tenderness falls under “Evolving.” So does a change in the size, shape, color or elevation of the mole. A melanoma may also begin to bleed or crust over.

What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.