Who is affected by Hodgkin’s lymphoma?

Hodgkin lymphoma can develop at any age, but it mostly affects young adults in their early 20s and older adults over the age of 70. Slightly more men than women are affected.

Who is most at risk for Hodgkin’s lymphoma?

Risk factors for Hodgkin lymphoma include:

  • Age. Hodgkin lymphoma occurs most often in people in their 20 and 30s or after age 55.
  • Gender. More men than women get Hodgkin lymphoma.
  • Family history. …
  • Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. …
  • HIV infection. …
  • Weakened immune system.

What age group is affected by Hodgkin’s lymphoma?

Both children and adults can develop Hodgkin lymphoma, but it’s most common in early adulthood (especially in a person’s 20s). The risk of Hodgkin lymphoma rises again in late adulthood (after age 55). Overall, the average age of people when they are diagnosed is 39.

Can adults get Hodgkin’s lymphoma?

Being in early or late adulthood, being male, past Epstein-Barr infection, and a family history of Hodgkin lymphoma can increase the risk of adult Hodgkin lymphoma. Signs and symptoms of adult Hodgkin lymphoma include swollen lymph nodes, fever, drenching night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue.

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Where is Hodgkin’s lymphoma most common?

Although Hodgkin lymphoma can start almost anywhere, most often it starts in lymph nodes in the upper part of the body. The most common sites are in the chest, neck, or under the arms. Hodgkin lymphoma most often spreads through the lymph vessels from lymph node to lymph node.

What were your first signs of lymphoma?

Swollen lymph nodes, fever, and night sweats are common symptoms of lymphoma.

General Symptoms

  • Fever.
  • Night sweats.
  • Unexplained weight loss.
  • Itchy skin.
  • Fatigue.
  • Loss of appetite.

What age group gets lymphoma?

What Causes Lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma becomes more common as people get older. Unlike most cancers, rates of Hodgkin lymphoma are highest among teens and young adults (ages 15 to 39 years) and again among older adults (ages 75 years or older).

Is Hodgkins hereditary?

Hodgkin lymphoma isn’t infectious and isn’t thought to run in families. Although your risk is increased if a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or child) has had lymphoma, it’s not clear if this is because of an inherited genetic fault or lifestyle factors.

How can you prevent Hodgkin’s lymphoma?

Reducing Your Risk of Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. Quit smoking —For people who smoke, it takes the body longer to fight infections and heal wounds. Quitting smoking is an important step in preventing Hodgkin lymphoma and other cancers. …
  2. Manage exposures —Pesticides and formaldehyde are common exposures.

What is the life expectancy of someone with Hodgkin’s lymphoma?

Survival rates can give you an idea of what percentage of people with the same type and stage of cancer are still alive a certain amount of time (usually 5 years) after they were diagnosed.

5-year relative survival rates for Hodgkin lymphoma.

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SEER Stage 5-Year Relative Survival Rate
All SEER stages combined 87%

How long can you have Hodgkin’s lymphoma without knowing?

These grow so slowly that patients can live for many years mostly without symptoms, although some may experience pain from an enlarged lymph gland. After five to 10 years, low-grade disorders begin to progress rapidly to become aggressive or high-grade and produce more severe symptoms.

Is lymphoma similar to leukemia?

Leukemia and lymphoma are both forms of blood cancer, but they affect the body in different ways. The main difference is that leukemia affects the blood and bone marrow, while lymphomas mainly affect the lymph nodes.

How does Hodgkin’s lymphoma affect the body?

Depending on where the cancerous cells move in your body, you may experience jaundice (liver), pain in your bones (bone marrow), weakness (nerves and muscles), or breathing difficulties (lungs). Some people notice increased bleeding, itching, fatigue, loss of appetite, and weight loss.