What does Stage 3 endometrial cancer mean?

How is Stage 3 endometrial cancer treated?

If you are diagnosed with stage III endometrial cancer, you will likely receive a combination of surgery to remove your uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, and lymph nodes, followed by radiation and, if necessary, chemotherapy.

What does it mean to have Stage 3 uterine cancer?

Stage III uterine cancer extends outside the uterus, but remains confined to the pelvis. Stage IIIA cancers invade the lining of the pelvis or fallopian tubes or cancer cells can be found free in the pelvis. Stage IIIB cancer invades the vagina.

Does endometrial cancer spread quickly?

The most common type of endometrial cancer (type 1) grows slowly. It most often is found only inside the uterus. Type 2 is less common. It grows more rapidly and tends to spread to other parts of the body.

Can you live a long life after endometrial cancer?

If your cancer is likely to respond well to treatment, your doctor will say you have a favorable prognosis. This means you’re expected to live many years and may even be cured.

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How long can you live with stage 3 endometrial cancer?

From the National Cancer Institute, based on an older staging system. Numbers are for five-year relative survival, which accounts for other causes of death in the same time period.

Uterine Sarcoma Survival Rates by Stage.

Stage Five-Year Survival Rate
II 45%
III 30%
IV 15%

How bad is stage 3 uterus cancer?

If you have stage 2 or 3 womb cancer and the cancer has spread to the cervix or nearby lymph nodes in the pelvis, you may have a radical or total hysterectomy. This involves the additional removal of the cervix and the top of your vagina, as well as the removal of the pelvic lymph nodes.

Can endometrial cancer come back after hysterectomy?

Endometrial cancer is most likely to recur in the first three years after the initial treatment, though late recurrence is also possible. If you would like to speak with a physician at Moffitt Cancer Center about endometrial cancer or undergoing a hysterectomy, we invite you to request an appointment.

Is endometrial cancer a terminal?

Uterus cancer has a more favorable prognosis when it’s diagnosed and treated in the earliest stages. Uterine cancer is not fatal when it is diagnosed and treated in the early stages. Generally, a 5-year survival rate for patients in stage 1 of uterine cancer is 90%.

What were your first signs of endometrial cancer?

The most likely symptoms are:

  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge, which occurs in nine out of 10 women with endometrial cancer. …
  • Vaginal discharge that may range from pink and watery to thick, brown, and foul smelling.
  • Difficult or painful urination.
  • An enlarged uterus, detectable during a pelvic exam.
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Is endometrial cancer genetic?

While endometrial (uterine) cancer is not passed down from mother to daughter, some families do have a higher risk of developing this malignancy – particularly families in which Lynch syndrome is common.

What are the main causes of endometrial cancer?

Endometrial Cancer Causes and Risk Factors

  • Obesity.
  • Diet high in animal fat.
  • Family history of endometrial, ovarian and/or colon cancers (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer)
  • Starting monthly periods before age 12.
  • Late menopause.
  • Infertility (inability to become pregnant)
  • Never having children.

Where does endometrial cancer spread first?

In general, uterine cancer can metastasize to the rectum or bladder. Other areas where it may spread include the vagina, ovaries and fallopian tubes. This form of cancer is typically slow growing and often detected before it has spread to more distant areas of the body.

Is endometrial cancer the same as uterine cancer?

Endometrial cancer begins in the layer of cells that form the lining (endometrium) of the uterus. Endometrial cancer is sometimes called uterine cancer. Other types of cancer can form in the uterus, including uterine sarcoma, but they are much less common than endometrial cancer.

Does endometrial cancer spread to lungs?

Endometrial cancer patients with lung metastases are rare, and more rarely with long-term management of progesterone after recurrence.