What is basal cell carcinoma for kids?

It’s a very treatable cancer. It starts in the basal cell layer of the skin (epidermis) and grows very slowly. The cancer usually appears as a small, shiny bump or nodule on the skin. It occurs mainly on areas exposed to the sun, such as the head, neck, arms, hands, and face.

How common is basal cell carcinoma in children?

Non-melanoma skin cancers appear to be the most often malignant tumors. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 75% of non-melonoma skin cancers and peaks in the seventh decade [1]. Although it is frequent in the elderly, BCC is extremely rare in children under 15 years of age.

Can teens get basal cell?

Nonmelanoma skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are extremely rare in children and teens.

How do you describe basal cell carcinoma?

Cancer that begins in the lower part of the epidermis (the outer layer of the skin). It may appear as a small white or flesh-colored bump that grows slowly and may bleed. Basal cell carcinomas are usually found on areas of the body exposed to the sun.

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Do kids get squamous cell carcinoma?

Squamous cell carcinoma is rare in children. Melanoma accounts for a small percentage of all skin cancers, but accounts for most deaths from skin cancer. Melanoma starts in the cells that produce pigment in the skin. Melanoma sometimes appears as a new or changing mole.

When should I worry about a mole on my child?

If a mole bleeds without reason, however, it should be checked. A mole that looks like an open sore is also worrisome. Bleeding or a break in the skin can be a sign of melanoma. Bottom line: If your child has a mole that starts to bleed or looks like an open sore, a dermatologist should examine the mole.

Are skin cancers itchy?

Skin cancers often don’t cause bothersome symptoms until they have grown quite large. Then they may itch, bleed, or even hurt. But typically they can be seen or felt long before they reach this point.

Is Basal Cell Carcinoma painful?

It may feel itchy, tender, or painful. Basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers can look like a variety of marks on the skin. The key warning signs are a new growth, a spot or bump that’s getting larger over time, or a sore that doesn’t heal within a few weeks.

Can you pick off a basal cell carcinoma?

Yes, you might be able to pick this crusty lesion off with your fingers. But it would grow back. The right thing to do is see a dermatologist and have it removed.

Where is carcinoma found?

Carcinoma is the most common type of cancer. It begins in the epithelial tissue of the skin, or in the tissue that lines internal organs, such as the liver or kidneys. Carcinomas may spread to other parts of the body, or be confined to the primary location.

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Should I worry about basal cell carcinoma?

Basal cell carcinoma is a cancer that grows on parts of your skin that get a lot of sun. It’s natural to feel worried when your doctor tells you that you have it, but keep in mind that it’s the least risky type of skin cancer. As long as you catch it early, you can be cured.

Can carcinoma be cured?

Most cases of squamous cell carcinoma can be cured when found early and treated properly. Today, many treatment options are available, and most are easily performed at a doctor’s office.

What happens if basal cell goes untreated?

If left untreated, basal cell carcinomas can become quite large, cause disfigurement, and in rare cases, spread to other parts of the body and cause death. Your skin covers your body and protects it from the environment.

Can kids get skin tags?

Children and toddlers may also develop skin tags, particularly in the underarm and neck areas. Skin tags are more common in overweight people. Hormone elevations, such as those seen during pregnancy, may cause an increase in the formation of skin tags, as skin tags are more frequent in pregnant women.

What does pediatric melanoma look like?

While melanoma in adults tends to turn darker, it is often whitish, yellowish, or pink in children. The most common symptoms of melanoma include: A bump on the skin that itches or bleeds. A wart-like spot that is typically yellowish, whitish, or pink.