What part of the body does oral cancer affect?

Oral cancers develop on the tongue, the tissue lining the mouth and gums, under the tongue, at the base of the tongue, and the area of the throat at the back of the mouth. Oral cancer accounts for roughly three percent of all cancers diagnosed annually in the United States, or about 53,000 new cases each year.

Where are oral cancers most commonly found?

The most common locations for cancer in the oral cavity are:

  • Tongue.
  • Tonsils.
  • Oropharynx.
  • Gums.
  • Floor of the mouth.

What areas of the mouth can oral cancer effect?

Oral cancer can affect any of the working parts of your mouth or oral cavity, which include the:

  • lips.
  • tissue that lines lips and cheeks.
  • teeth.
  • front two-thirds of the tongue (the back third of the tongue, or base, is considered part of the oropharynx, or throat)
  • gums.

Where is squamous cell carcinoma found in the mouth?

About 40% of intraoral squamous cell carcinomas begin on the floor of the mouth or on the lateral and ventral surfaces of the tongue. About 38% of all oral squamous cell carcinomas occur on the lower lip; these are usually solar-related cancers on the external surface.

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What kind of oral cancers are there?

Types of Lip and Oral (Mouth) Cancer

  • Lymphoma.
  • Minor salivary gland, including: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) Mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma.
  • Mucosal melanoma.
  • Sarcomas.
  • Squamous cell carcinoma.

Where does oral cancer occur?

Oral cancers develop on the tongue, the tissue lining the mouth and gums, under the tongue, at the base of the tongue, and the area of the throat at the back of the mouth. Oral cancer accounts for roughly three percent of all cancers diagnosed annually in the United States, or about 53,000 new cases each year.

What can be mistaken for oral cancer?

Mouth cancer on your gums can sometimes be mistaken for gingivitis, a common gum inflammation. Some of the signs are similar, including bleeding gums. However, gum cancer symptoms also include white, red or dark patches on the gums, cracking gums, and thick areas on the gums.

How can you detect oral cancer at home?

Pull your checks out to view the inside of your mouth, the lining of your cheeks, and the back gums. Pull out your tongue and look at all surfaces; examine the floor of your mouth. Look at the back of your throat. Feel for lumps or enlarged lymph nodes in both sides of your neck and under your lower jaw.

How do I know if I have oral squamous cell carcinoma?

Signs and symptoms of mouth cancer may include:

  1. A lip or mouth sore that doesn’t heal.
  2. A white or reddish patch on the inside of your mouth.
  3. Loose teeth.
  4. A growth or lump inside your mouth.
  5. Mouth pain.
  6. Ear pain.
  7. Difficult or painful swallowing.
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What areas of the mouth are the most common sites for squamous cell carcinoma?

Site distribution showed that the most common location of the tumors was the border of the tongue (37%), followed by the alveolar mucosa and gingiva (20%) and floor of the mouth and ventral tongue (19%).

What is the most common oral precancerous lesion?

The most common oral precancerous lesions are oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF), and oral erythroplakia.

Where is the base of the tongue located?

The back third of the tongue, which starts in the throat, is known as the base of the tongue. It is part of the oropharynx, which also includes the tonsils, the walls of the throat, and the soft palate (back part of the roof of the mouth).

Is the oropharynx the throat?

The part of the throat at the back of the mouth behind the oral cavity. It includes the back third of the tongue, the soft palate, the side and back walls of the throat, and the tonsils.

Is the oral cavity the mouth?

Refers to the mouth. It includes the lips, the lining inside the cheeks and lips, the front two thirds of the tongue, the upper and lower gums, the floor of the mouth under the tongue, the bony roof of the mouth, and the small area behind the wisdom teeth.